?Limitations?

srysry
edited December 1969 in SignalScope Pro
Can I use this software to test any signal? What's it's voltage limit?

Let's suppose I want to use it to test a circuit board, is my Macbook Aluminum 13' going to be safe?

I am into electronics and this would be really helpful to measure some signals with my Macbook would be like a dream come true ;)

I would really appreciate an answer.

Comments

  • Come on? Please?
  • Can I use this software to test any signal? What's it's voltage limit?
    You can test any signal that your hardware will support. In other words, the software is limited by the hardware. So, if you're using the audio I/O built into your Macbook, then that's the hardware that will determine your measurement bandwidth and voltage limits.

    You certainly can analyze circuit boards with your Macbook, but you do so at your own risk. You need to take care to ensure that you are performing "safe" measurements. High voltages could damage the input and or output circuitry of your Macbook. Peak input voltages accepted (without significant distortion) by the line input on a Mac may be as high as 5 volts (~10 volts peak-to-peak), but you'll need to confirm that for your specific model. (Performing a voltage calibration, according to the tutorial in the SignalScope Pro Help documents, will tell you what your full-scale input voltage is.)

    Feel free to post any further questions.

    Ben
  • Ok, so it's safe to try up to 5 volts, by saying depending on the hardware you mean I could get external hardware to test higher voltages? If so is there any hardware recommended?

    I am a Biomedical Engineering student so this sounds like a really helpful tool so far!
  • Ok, so it's safe to try up to 5 volts
    It should be, but I recommend starting with a lower voltage (< 1 V) and performing a voltage calibration to see what the full-scale input of your hardware is.
    by saying depending on the hardware you mean I could get external hardware to test higher voltages?
    Yes.
    If so is there any hardware recommended?
    AudioFire devices, from Echo Audio, can handle inputs of up to around 8.2 volts peak (~16 Vpp). Alternatively, you could also use probes with built-in attenuation to measure higher voltages (you would need to find the right adapters to connect them to your audio device). You just want to keep in mind that you need to be careful not to apply high voltages to your audio input(s).

    Ben
  • Thanks, that was really helpful, I shall now consult with my department to get the product.
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