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Topics - FaberAST

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31
Can SignalScope analyze DC  (or very low frequency) signals?

SignalScope is capable of analyzing DC signals, although audio interfaces typically employ AC coupling on the input signals, which causes the signals to be attenuated below 20 Hz.
(If you are interested in support for data acquisition hardware capable of analyzing DC signals, please let us know.)

32
SignalScope/Pro FAQ / How do I analyze the data in a sound file?
« on: July 23, 2007, 11:08:21 AM »
How do I analyze the data in a sound file?

SignalScope Pro 2
SignalScope Pro now includes a built-in signal generator with support for generator Audio Units. Mac OS X ships with a generator unit called AUAudioFilePlayer. If that Audio Unit is used to play back a sound file, then you can analyze the data in the file directly by selecting the same output channels in an analyzer as those used by the Signal Generator tool.


SignalScope 1.x/2.x, SignalScope Pro 1.x
There are several ways to accomplish this.  In either case the sound file will need to be played back from another application (iTunes, for example).

First option:  Use a cable to connect the audio output directly to the audio input on your Mac (or whatever audio I/O device you are using).

Second option:  Use Soundflower to route the output of the player application directly to SignalScope.  Soundflower mimics a hardware audio device and it will appear in the device list, just like any other audio device.  Check out the tutorial.

Third option:  Use Jack (www.jackosx.com) to route the output of
the player application directly to SignalScope.  SignalScope can see Jack the same way it sees any audio input device. Check out the tutorial.

33
Can a registered copy of SignalScope, SignalScope Pro, SignalSuite, or Electroacoustics Toolbox be cloned for easy installation on multiple computers (for instance, in a school computer lab)?

Please contact us for information regarding your specific needs.

34
Is it possible to try out the program with all features enabled before purchasing a serial number?

Yes. Please contact us if you need a limited-time, full trial of one of our software products.

35
How long does the program work before I have to purchase a license?

Any of our software products may be used on a feature-limited basis for 30 days. After 30 days you must purchase a serial number in order to activate the software for continued use.

36
I just purchased a serial number, but it isn't being accepted by
the program.  Now what?


It takes some time for the serial number to be recognized by the
web server responsible for product activation.  If registration
fails, please wait until at least 15 minutes after you received
your serial number.

If registration continues to fail, please check to be sure the
serial number is being entered exactly as it should.  Sometimes
when performing a copy and paste, an extra space may get inserted
at the beginning of the number.

The next thing to try is to click the Manual Registration button
after entering your serial number, rather than the Register button. 
This works for some people, particularly those with wireless
internet connections, when the standard registration procedure
does not.

If registration continues to fail:
Contact us
and provide any error messages that may have been
displayed by the program as well as any relevant details about
your system.

37
This tutorial has been moved to the blog.

38
Articles / Routing signals directly to SignalScope using Soundflower
« on: January 25, 2007, 12:30:11 PM »
Routing Signals Directly to SignalScope using Soundflower

The question often arises of whether one can use SignalScope (or SignalScope Pro) to analyze signals directly from another application (like SignalSuite or iTunes).  Although this can be done via an appropriate cable routed from the audio output on your Mac directly to the audio input, there is another solution which allows the routing to be done entirely in software. Soundflower is a free software tool that mimics a hardware device, which allows audio data to be transferred directly between applications on your Mac.

Soundflower can be downloaded from www.cycling74.com/products/soundflower, where there are also instructions on how to use it.


Tutorial: SignalSuite to SignalScope

In order to route signals directly from SignalSuite to SignalScope (or SignalScope Pro) via Soundflower, perform the following steps:
  • Download and install Soundflower (version 1.2 was used for this tutorial).
  • Run SignalSuite.
  • In the audio output device setup section in SignalSuite, select Soundflower (2ch) as the current device.
  • Turn on the desired signal generator in SignalSuite.
  • Start SignalSuite's Master Output.
  • Run SignalScope.
  • In the audio input device setup section in SignalScope, select Soundflower (2ch) as the current device.
  • Start SignalScope.
  • Now any signals produced by SignalSuite will be routed directly to SignalScope for analysis and visualization!
  • Enjoy!



39
Articles / Measuring Time Delay with Electroacoustics Toolbox
« on: January 02, 2007, 04:52:26 PM »
This tutorial has been moved to the blog.

40
This tutorial has been moved to the blog.

41
Electroacoustics Toolbox / Welcome to the Electroacoustics Toolbox forum!
« on: December 19, 2006, 01:55:28 PM »
    On December 14, 2006, Faber Acoustical introduced a new standard in audio and acoustics test and measurement solutions for Mac OS X.  Electroacoustics Toolbox was designed from the ground up to be an extremely powerful platform for multi-device, multi-channel, real-time signal analysis and data acquisition.  It makes precise measurements of electric and acoustic quantities, as well as electronic, acoustic, and electroacoustic systems, such as filter circuits, listening rooms, recording and live sound systems, and loudspeakers.
    Feel free to use this forum to post your questions, comments, or suggestions about how to get the most out of this fantastic new tool.

42
Articles / Basic Frequency Response Measurements
« on: July 18, 2005, 05:29:14 PM »
Performing Basic Frequency Response Measurements with SignalScope
Wouldn't it be great if you could use SignalScope for frequency response measurements? Well, you can! There are numerous ways to perform frequency response measurements, and future versions of SignalScope Pro will offer more of them, but SignalScope and SignalScope Pro offer some options for performing basic measurements right now.

The tools used in the demonstrations below include SignalScope (and SignalScope Pro), SignalSuite, and audio input and output (I/O) from an Edirol FA-101 FireWire interface.

Frequency response measurements are often performed using narrowband or fractional octave band spectral analysis. SignalScope can perform narrowband analysis, but SignalScope Pro is required for octave or third-octave analysis.

Narrowband Frequency Response

The basic idea behind the measurements described here is that if a spectrally white signal is applied to the input of a device (hereafter referred to as the device under test, or DUT), the spectrum of the DUT's output signal will represent the frequency response of the DUT. A signal with a white spectrum is one which contains equal energy at all frequencies, so that if viewed on an FFT analyzer the spectrum will appear as a flat, horizontal line. Additional explanation follows.

Consider the block diagram, below, in which a linear, time-invariant (LTI) system, represented by h, has an input signal, x, and an output signal y. In the time domain, the system's output, y(t), is the convolution of the input signal, x(t), with the impulse response of the system, h(t). In the frequency domain, the system's output, Y(f), is the product of the input signal, X(f), and the frequency response of the system, H(f).



Now, if the input signal is spectrally white, it will be a constant value for all values of (f). Let this constant be A and the frequency response of the system is given by the output signal divided by A. This means that just by measuring the output signal of some unknown system, the DUT, its frequency response can be measured, as long as the input signal is spectrally white.
 
SignalSuite provides several types of signals that can be considered spectrally white under certain conditions. These include random noise, Maximum Length Sequences (MLS), specially tailored pseudorandom noise, and chirp (swept sine) signals. The use of each of these is demonstrated below.


White Noise





Maximum Length Sequence (MLS)





Pseudorandom Noise





Chirp (Swept Sine)









43
Articles / Sending Signals Directly to SignalScope with Jack OS X
« on: July 18, 2005, 04:26:21 PM »
Sending Signals Directly to SignalScope
with Jack OS X

The question often arises of whether one can use SignalScope (or SignalScope Pro) to analyze signals directly from another application (like SignalSuite or iTunes).  Although this can be done via an appropriate cable routed from the audio output on your Mac directly to the audio input, there is another solution which allows the routing to be done entirely in software. Jack is a type of audio server, which allows audio data to be transferred directly between applications on your Mac. Although Jack was originally written for the GNU/Linux operating system, Jack OS X provides a convenient implementation for Mac OS X.

Please visit the Jack OS X website, www.jackosx.com, to learn more about Jack OS X.



Tutorial: SignalSuite to SignalScope

In order to route signals directly from SignalSuite to SignalScope (or SignalScope Pro) via Jack, perform the following steps:


  • Download and install Jack OS X (version 0.71 was used for this tutorial).
  • After installation, run the JackPilot application.
  • Click the Start button to start the Jack audio server.
  • Run SignalScope and SignalSuite (both applications must be started after the Jack server is started).
  • In the audio output device setup section in SignalSuite, select Jack Router as the current device.
  • In the audio output device setup section in SignalSuite, select Stream 2 for Channel 2 (Right).
  • In the audio input device setup section in SignalScope, select Jack Router as the current device.
  • In the audio input device setup section in SignalScope, select Stream 2 for Channel 2 (Right).
  • Start SignalSuite's Master Output.
  • Start SignalScope.
  • In JackPilot, click the Routing button to open the Connections Manager.
  • In the Connections Manager...
    • Under Send Ports, click on SignalSuite (once) to reveal it's output destinations (colored red) in the Receive Ports list.
    • Under Receive Ports, double-click SignalScope (or SignalScope Pro) to designate it as a receiver of SignalSuite's output.
    • If Built-in Audio is also colored red, double-click it to remove it from SignalSuite's output destinations.
    • Under Receive Ports, click on SignalScope (once) to reveal its input sources (colored red) in the Send Ports list.
    • If Built-in Audio is colored red, double-click it to remove it from SignalScope's input sources.
    • Make sure SignalSuite is colored red in the Send Ports list.
  • Now any signals produced by SignalSuite will be routed directly to SignalScope for analysis and visualization!


44
SignalSuite / Welcome to the SignalSuite forum
« on: July 14, 2005, 07:19:04 PM »
Feel free to use this forum to post questions, concerns, suggestions, tips, or other relevant information regarding SignalSuite.

45
SignalScope / Welcome to the SignalScope forum
« on: July 14, 2005, 07:18:20 PM »
Feel free to use this forum to post questions, concerns, suggestions, tips, or other relevant information regarding SignalScope.

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